About Laura M. Lloyd, Ph.D., J.D.

With my extensive skill and experience in molecular biology, immunology and virology, I help companies and universities protect their intellectual property. I represent and counsel clients in domestic and international patent and trademark prosecution, negotiation of patent licenses, and trademark coexistence agreements. I also represent clients in opposition and infringement cases before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, federal courts in California and Texas, and the International Trade Commission. I have prepared and prosecuted numerous foreign and domestic patent applications and issues in areas ranging from biotechnology, molecular biology, immunology and virology to diagnostics, medical devices, therapeutics, small molecules, and pharmaceuticals. My science credentials include positions as a Research Associate/National Institutes of Health, Post-Doctoral Training Fellow in the Department of Pathology and Microbiology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, and Research Scientist with Streck Laboratories in Omaha, Nebraska.

Don’t Get Scammed: Warning For IP Applicants and Registrants

Biotech Boardwalk

There are ongoing scams targeting patent, trademark, and copyright applicants and registrants. Although each scam varies slightly, they all generally involve notices intended to look like they are coming from an official government office such as the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

The notices, sent by unscrupulous entities and organizations, are designed to solicit fees from applicants. In fact, they may often be called “invoices.”

To give the appearance of legitimacy, they usually contain publically available information about the application or registration and use names and logos that resemble official entities like the USPTO or, the case of an international application, the World Intellectual Property Organization.

In one recent case, a client received a notice from an entity calling itself the “United States Trademark Registration Office.” The “invoice” requested payment in the amount of $375 for registration with U.S. Customs and Border Protection and trademark monitoring services.

Despite what this mailing…

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Copyright FAQ: Is a Copyright Notice Required?

Biotech Boardwalk

U.S. law no longer requires the use of a copyright notice. However, prior law did contain such a requirement, and the use
of a notice is still relevant to the copyright status of older works.

Works published before January 1, 1978, are governed by the previous copyright law. Under that law, if a work was published under the copyright owner’s authority without a proper notice of copyright, all copyright protection for that work was permanently lost in the United States.

The Benefits of a Copyright Notice

Although a copyright notice is not required, it is certainly beneficial. A copyright notice informs the public that a work is protected by copyright, identifies the copyright owner, and shows the year of first publication.

More importantly, in the event that a work is infringed, if a copyright notice was used, the court will not give any weight to a defendant’s claim that he…

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The Coolest Back to School Patents

One of the most exciting things about the start of the school year for most students is the pre-school year shopping trip to collect all new supplies for the coming year. In putting together this list, we tried to find the coolest back to school supply patents that we would have actually used in grade school. We think you’ll agree with our choices. 

Source: The Coolest Back to School Patents